To help you stay safe during this Holiday Season, we are offering a few simple phrases to help you avoid common holiday fire hazards. Holiday Lighting 1. Inspect lighting for worn insulation or loose light bulbs 2. Turn the lights off before leaving the house or going to bed 3. Don’t overload electrical sockets Christmas Trees 1. Before placing the tree in the stand, cut 2 inches off the base of the tree 2. Make sure the tree is three feet away from all heat sources like a radiators, heating ducts or fireplaces 3. Add water to the tree every morning and every night 4. Throw away the tree once it begins to drop needles, this indicates that it is dried out and is a real fire hazard 5. Never use lit candles to decorate a tree Cooking 1. Keep kitchen towels and clothing away from the stove 2. Keep your children away from the cooking area 3. Unattended cooking is the number one cause of cooking fires Finally, check your smoke alarms to make sure they are in working order! HAVE A HAPPY AND SAFE HOLIDAY SEASON!! Adapted from NFPA Safety Information: Escape Planning Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as two minutes to escape safely once the alarm sounds. Your ability to get out depends on advance warning from smoke alarms, and advance planning – a home fire escape plan that everyone is familiar with and has practiced. Here are some Basic Fire Escape Planning Tips:   Putting your plan to the test FEMA, National Commission on Children and Disasters Announce New Partnership to Promote Fire Safety Awareness for Families Announcement Comes as FEMA Releases New Report Showing Children under Four at Growing Risk of Death or Injury in Fires Release Date: February 14, 2011 Release Number: HQ-11-017 Released by FEMA: WASHINGTON, D.C. — With home fires on the rise in winter months, and a new study showing that young children are at an especially high risk of getting seriously injured or dying in residential fires, today the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Commission on Children and Disasters are announcing a new public awareness campaign to help keep children and families safer from the threat of home fires. As part of this effort, today FEMA’s U.S. Fire Administration is releasing a new report on the risks fires pose to children. The report, which is based on the latest available data released by the National Center for Health Statistics, found that young children face the greatest – and a growing – risk of death or serious injury in home fires, with 52 percent of all child fire deaths in 2007 involving children under the age of four, a slight increase from the most recent study previously conducted in 2004. Click here for a copy of the report. “This latest report reveals a deeply troubling trend and should serve as a wake-up call for all of us,” said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate. “The bottom line is that one of the greatest threats our youngest kids may face during the winter months exist in their homes. It’s critical that all families are aware of these risks and take the simple steps now to prevent fires due to cooking, heating or other causes at home. These deaths are preventable, and working together we can educate each other and save lives.” “During the past decade of unprecedented disasters, the needs of kids were too often left behind in disaster planning,” said Mark Shriver, Chairman, National Commission on Children and Disasters. “We not only hope this partnership helps better protect children from home fires, but also puts a spotlight on the unique needs of kids when disasters strike. We’re grateful that Administrator Fugate has demonstrated such strong leadership and made significant progress for protecting children in a very short time.” In addition, the report found that: •Deaths from fires and burns were the second leading cause of accidental deaths not related to transportation, after drowning; •Boys are at higher-risk of dying from fires than girls; •Between 2006 and 2008, smoke alarms were not present in at least 23 percent of residential fires; •African-American children are at an increased risk of fire deaths; and • Low-income children are at greatest risk of exposure to home fires. “Children are one of our most vulnerable populations. Through diverse partnerships we can highlight the dangers which are threatening children throughout the country,” said FEMA Acting U.S. Fire Administrator Glenn Gaines. “Through reports, such as this one, we can target specific types of hazards to keep children safe from fires.” To help families protect their homes and loved ones, especially young children, from fires, FEMA, the U.S. Fire Administration and the National Commission on Children and Disasters are asking families to take simple steps now to prevent fires in their residences, and partnering with leading organizations across the fire, emergency medical services, public health and emergency management fields to get the message out. To provide families with important tips about fire safety and lists of additional resources, FEMA is launching online and social media tools, including: •An updated web page dedicated to children’s fire safety, including tips on how to prevent the two leading causes of fire during the winter months: cooking and heating; •A widget that will link to this website and resources; •A Facebook tab; and •A dedicated Twitter hashtag to engage the public in a dialogue about how to protect kids from fires. Among other things, these updated tools with offer tips for how to prevent the two leading causes of fires during the winter months: heating and cooking. NEWS from CPSC U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission 
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Office of Information and Public Affairs Washington, DC 20207 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 10, 2011 Alert #11-726    Firm’s Recall Hotline: (800)933-9904 CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772 CPSC Media Contact: (613) 957-2983    “Camp Nod” Lantern Nightlights Recalled Due to Shock and Fire Hazard
   
The following product safety recall was voluntarily conducted by the firm in cooperation with the CPSC. Consumers should stop using the product immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.
 
Name of Product: “Camp Nod” lantern nightlights
Units: About 9,700 
Manufacturer: The Land of Nod, of Northbrook, Ill.    
Hazard: An electrical short circuit can occur in the nightlight’s wiring, posing a risk of fire or shock hazard to consumers.   
Incidents/Injuries: The firm has received 16 reports of incidents, including one report of minor shock to a woman and her son, and one report of minor property damage to a wall, bed and blanket near the lantern’s power source.   
Description: This recall involves “Camp Nod” electric lantern nightlights. The red or blue cylindrical-shaped metal lanterns have a glass bulb cover. The lantern nightlights measure about 9.75 inches in height and about 4 inches in diameter. The lanterns have either a barbell tag on the cord that includes item number 0603041-RE (red) or 0603041-BL (blue), or a tag affixed to the underside of the lantern that includes the words “The Land of Nod.”   
Sold exclusively at: The Land of Nod stores in Illinois and Washington, The Land of Nod catalog and website from September 2004 through October 2010 for about $30 to $35.   
Manufactured in: China   
Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the nightlight and return it to The Land of Nod to receive a merchandise credit for the purchase price.   
Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact The Land of Nod at (800) 933-9904 between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, visit the firm’s website at www.landofnod.com, or email the firm at recall@landofnod.com   
 
   
 
Picture of Recalled Lantern Nightlight   
CPSC is still interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are either directly related to this product recall or involve a different hazard with the same product. Please tell us about it by visiting www.saferproducts.gov
 
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death from thousands of types of consumer products under the agency’s jurisdiction. The CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical, or mechanical hazard. The CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products – such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters, and household chemicals – contributed significantly to the decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years.
 
To report a dangerous product or a product-related injury, call CPSC’s Hotline at (800) 638-2772 or CPSC’s teletypewriter at (301) 595-7054. To join a CPSC e-mail subscription list, please go to https://www.cpsc.gov/cpsclist.aspx. Consumers can obtain recall and general safety information by logging on to CPSC’s Web site at www.cpsc.gov.
 
    
 
 
         
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NEWS from CPSC U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission 
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Office of Information and Public Affairs Washington, DC 20207 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE February 24, 2011 Release #11-144 Firm’s Recall Hotline: (800) 245-4595 CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772 CPSC Media Contact: (613) 957-2983  Pier 1 Imports Recalls Golden Tea Lights Due to Fire Hazard

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and Health Canada, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Name of Product: Golden tea lights sold with ornament tea light holders

Units: About 370,000 tea lights in United States and 30,000 tea lights in Canada

Importer: Pier 1 Imports®, of Fort Worth, Texas

Hazard: The flame from the tea lights can burn with a high flame, posing a fire hazard.

Incidents/Injuries: The firm has received four reports of high flames. In one of these incidents, the consumer suffered a minor burn.

Description: This recall involves all tea lights in golden tin cups sold in sets of five with either the Red Ornament Tea Light Holder (SKU 2473959) or the White Ornament Tea Light Holder (SKU 2473961). The SKU number is found on the packaging.

Sold exclusively at: Pier 1 Imports stores from September 2010 through January 2011 for between $2 and $8.

Manufactured in: China

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled tea lights and return them to their nearest Pier 1 Imports store to receive new tea lights.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Pier 1 Imports at (800) 245-4595 between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. CT Monday through Friday or visit Pier 1 Imports’ website at www.pier1.com

Note: Health Canada’s press release is available at http://cpsr-rspc.hc-sc.gc.ca/PR-RP/recall-retrait-eng.jsp?re_id=1281

Picture of Recalled Tea Lights

CPSC is still interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are either directly related to this product recall or involve a different hazard with the same product. Please tell us about it by visiting www.saferproducts.gov
 
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death from thousands of types of consumer products under the agency’s jurisdiction. The CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical, or mechanical hazard. The CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products – such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters, and household chemicals – contributed significantly to the decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years.
 
To report a dangerous product or a product-related injury, call CPSC’s Hotline at (800) 638-2772 or CPSC’s teletypewriter at (301) 595-7054. To join a CPSC e-mail subscription list, please go to https://www.cpsc.gov/cpsclist.aspx. Consumers can obtain recall and general safety information by logging on to CPSC’s Web site at www.cpsc.gov.
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

NEWS from CPSC

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission 

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Office of Information and Public Affairs Washington, DC 20207

  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 2, 2011 Release #11-150   Firm’s Recall Hotline: (888) 223-2628 CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772 CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908   Burlington Coat Factory Recalls Slow Cookers Due to Fire Hazard WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product. Name of Product: Slow Cooker Units: About 7,460 Retailer: Burlington Coat Factory, of Burlington, N.J. Importer/Distributor: Lehrhoff ABL, of Carlstadt, N.J. Hazard: The slow cooker’s control panel can overheat and melt, posing a fire hazard. Incidents/Injuries: The manufacturer has received 60 reports of the control panels smoking, melting and sparking, and three reports of panels catching fire. Fourteen incidents resulted in minor damage to countertops. No injuries have been reported. Description: This recall involves Bella Kitchen 5-quart programmable slow cookers. The slow cookers are black with “Bella Kitchen” printed on the control panel. Only slow cookers with model number WJ-5000DE and date codes 0907 or 0909 are included in this recall. The model number and the four-digit date code are printed on a label on the underside of the product. Sold at: Burlington Coat Factory stores from June 2010 through December 2010 for $20. Manufactured in: China Remedy: Consumers should stop using the slow cooker immediately, unplug it and return the slow cooker to Burlington Coat Factory for a full refund or store credit. Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Burlington Coat Factory toll-free at (888) 223-2628 between 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or visit the firm’s website at http://www.burlingtoncoatfactory.com

Bella Kitchen 5-quart slow cooker

— CPSC is still interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are either directly related to this product recall or involve a different hazard with the same product. Please tell us about it by visiting www.saferproducts.gov The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death from thousands of types of consumer products under the agency’s jurisdiction. The CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical, or mechanical hazard. The CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products – such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters, and household chemicals – contributed significantly to the decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years. To report a dangerous product or a product-related injury, call CPSC’s Hotline at (800) 638-2772 or CPSC’s teletypewriter at (301) 595-7054. To join a CPSC e-mail subscription list, please go to https://www.cpsc.gov/cpsclist.aspx. Consumers can obtain recall and general safety information by logging on to CPSC’s Web site at www.cpsc.gov.

National Fire Prevention Week is October 3-9th, 2010. This year the NFPA’s official theme for Fire Prevention week is “Smoke Alarms: A Sound You Can Live With!” As per NFPA, “This year’s campaign is designed to educate people about the importance of smoke alarms and encourage everyone to take the steps necessary to update and maintain their home smoke alarm protection.” Associated Fire Protection has dedicated this issue of The Detector to fire prevention in the home.  We encourage everyone to take some time during Fire Prevention Week to change the batteries/check the operation of the smoke detectors in your home or apartment.  In addition please discuss your fire escape plan with all the members of your household.  If you have any questions, please give us at 973-684-7250.  To take advantage of specials on smoke alarms and various home safety products visit our online store, or visit our retail store located at 100 Jackson Street, Paterson NJ 07501.

Did you know?

Smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in a reported fire in half. Many people may believe that their home is adequately protected if they have at least one smoke alarm in the home. However, smoke alarms should be installed on every level of the home (including the basement), outside each sleeping area, and inside each bedroom. Larger homes may need additional smoke alarms. Interconnection of smoke alarms or a fire alarm system is highly recommended; when one smoke alarm sounds, they all do. (This is particularly important in larger or multi-story homes, where the sound from distant smoke alarms may be reduced to the point that it may not be loud enough to provide proper warning, especially for sleeping individuals.) A licensed electrician can install hard-wired multiple-station alarms. Wireless alarms, which manufacturers have more recently begun producing, can be installed by the homeowner.

Test stand-alone smoke alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button. If an alarm “chirps,” warning the battery is low, replace the battery right away. All smoke alarms, including alarms that use 10-year batteries and those that are hard-wired alarms, should be replaced when they’re 10 years old (or sooner) if they do not respond properly when tested.  In more than half of the reported home fires in which the smoke alarms were present but did not operate even though the fire was large enough, batteries were missing or disconnected. Nuisance alarms were the leading reason for disconnected alarms. Never remove or disable a smoke alarm. Download NFPA’s free smoke alarm safety checklist (PDF) to test your knowledge about your home’s smoke alarms. Need to know more about smoke alarms? Information provided by NFPA and “Check Your Smoke Alarm Facts” by Mike Hazel.